Selena to receive Hollywood Walk of Fame Star on Nov. 3

On the heels of a popular Google Doodle this week honoring Selena Quintanilla Pérez, the pop culture icon will now posthumously receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Nov. 3.

“Before there was JLo, Shakira or Beyoncé, there was a transformative female artist called Selena,” said Otto Padron, president of Meruelo Media and sponsor of the tribute, in a statement. “Selena is one of the most influential music icons of the 20th century. Her music, style and smile are timeless and now her star will grace (Hollywood, Calif.) forever.”

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce last summer selected to honor Selena in its recording category along with other performers including John Legend, Clarence Avant, Ice Cube, a posthumous honor for Jerry Goldsmith, Hall & Oates, *NSYNC and New Edition.

Selena performs at Hemisfair Plaza in San Antonio, TX, April 24, 1994. Photo by Sung Park / The Austin American-Statesman

RELATED: SELENA’S LEGACY LIVES ON

On Selena’s Facebook fan page, music lovers expressed a similar sentiment that the honor was long overdue. “A dream come true,” wrote fan Hadeer Sinawe. “She deserved this even before her death.”

RELATED: SELENA INFLUENCED STYLE, BEAUTY

Texas native Eva Longoria will join Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti to proclaim Nov. 3 as official “Selena” Day in Los Angeles.

On March 31, 1995, Selena’s former fan club president Yolanda Saldivar fatally shot Selena at a Days Inn motel in Corpus Christi. But for many fans of the Tejano superstar, who was on the brink of crossing over to the English-language music market, Selena’s legacy lives on.

MORE LATINO CULTURAL ARTS: CULTURA EN AUSTIN

In honor of her Walk of Fame honor, check out our playlist of Selena songs:

‘Barrio Daze’ comedy show wraps up this weekend

Artistic Director Adrian Villegas will present one-man comedy “Barrio Daze.”

As anti-immigrant rhetoric rises across the country, playwright and performer Adrian Villegas imagines a world where hope sweeps through the barrio.

Villegas — who brought us the poignant yet hilarious Latino Comedy Project show “Gentrif*cked,” spotlighting the effects of gentrification on Latino neighborhoods — reprised his one-man show “Barrio Daze,” which wraps up this weekend. Don’t miss your chance to catch this last performance Sept. 14-16 at The Institution Theater in South Austin.

Using cultural humor and sharp social commentary as his tools of choice, Villegas brings to life nine characters ranging from a quick-tempered Tex-Mex bus driver to a Chicano U.S. Senate hopeful. “Barrio Daze” takes audiences on a tour through one day in the barrio during a turbulent national election. The lives of all of these characters collide on an important Election Day.

LISTEN: Interview with Adrian Villegas on Austin 360’s “I Love You So Much” Podcast

Villegas’ gift for creating humanizing portraits of U.S. Latino life with wit and thought-provoking instincts make “Barrio Daze” an important performance to check out as issues of race and immigration continue to dominate national and local headlines.

Tickets, which are $11, are available online at barriodaze.eventbrite.com.

Austin filmmakers explore immigration, motherhood in “An Uncertain Future” screening Friday

What’s it like to be a mother-to-be and an unauthorized immigrant? In “An Uncertain Future,” a new short film by Austinites Chelsea Hernandez and Iliana Sosa, the filmmakers follow the pregnancy of two Central Texas women – one who is an unauthorized immigrant and one whose husband is unauthorized – through President Trump’s election and inauguration. Both women in the film prepare for an uncertain future as U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement conduct raids in Austin and anti-immigrant sentiment rises across the country.

Join me Friday for a screening of “An Uncertain Future” at Atmosphere Cowork (2400 E. Cesar Chavez #208). After the film, I’ll moderate a panel discussion on the “Trump Administration’s Impact on the Latinx Community,” where the women featured in the film Ruth Guzman and Cristina Tzintzún will participate as well as: Martha Cotera, a Chicana feminist, historian and activist, Texas State University Assistant Professor of Philosophy Lori Gallegos and UT Austin Associate Professor of American Studies and Latino/a Studies Nicole Guidotti-Hernández.

CULTURA EN AUSTIN BLOG: Check out more Latino cultural art news  

“An Uncertain Future,” is part of a new Field of Vision and Firelight Media initiative called #Our100Days to produce and distribute 10 short films across the country that dive into issues ranging from immigration to LGBTQ rights.

Jolt Texas and Latinx Spaces are hosting the event, which begins with a happy hour at 6 p.m. and followed by music featuring violinist and singer-songwriter Carrie Rodriguez. The film screens at 7:30 p.m. with the panel discussion starting at 7:45 p.m. RSVP here.

Austin celebrates National Hispanic Heritage Month

Dancers from the Austin High School Ballet Folklorico perform on the floor of the Texas State Capitol rotund during the annual Diez y Seis de Septiembre celebration, sponsored by State Sen. Kirk Watson and State Rep. Eddie, in  2014.  RALPH BARRERA/ AMERICAN-STATESMAN
Dancers from the Austin High School Ballet Folklorico perform on the floor of the Texas State Capitol rotund during the annual Diez y Seis de Septiembre celebration, sponsored by State Sen. Kirk Watson and State Rep. Eddie, in 2014.
RALPH BARRERA/ AMERICAN-STATESMAN

While Mexico celebrates its Independence Day on Sept. 16, several other Latin American countries also celebrate their independence next month. Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua all have Independence Days on Sept. 15. Chile celebrates on Sept. 18 and Belize on Sept. 21.

All of these days coincide with the start of National Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S., which runs from Sept. 15-Oct. 15 and recognizes the contributions of Hispanics in America. The Hispanic Heritage Center of Texas, which is located in San Antonio, is currently seeking authentic photos, documents, paintings, audio recordings or film dating back to Texas’ beginnings to preserve family heritage and history. If you’d like to share your story, visit hhctx.org.

Americans have been celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month since President Ronald Reagan expanded Hispanic Heritage Week in 1988.

During the month, keep an eye out for special programming at schools, cultural centers, libraries and museums.

Austin’s PBS station KLRU plans to offer several documentaries both online and on television including a profile on the life of popular Mexican-American writer Rudolfo Anaya, which will air at 10:30 p.m. Sept. 21. It’ll also premiere the documentary “On Two Fronts: Latinos & Vietnam,” which tells the story of two siblings who stood on opposite sides of the Vietnam War, at 9 p.m. Sept. 22.

Do you know of other events celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month? Let us know in the comments section.

Selena tribute events in April

 Selena performs at Hemisfair Plaza in San Antonio, TX, April 24, 1994.  Photo by Sung Park / The Austin American-Statesman.
Selena performs at Hemisfair Plaza in San Antonio, TX, April 24, 1994. Photo by Sung Park / The Austin American-Statesman.

Update: Puro Chingón Collective’s April 10 event has changed its time and venue. The updated info is below.

March 31st marked 20 years since the world lost Selena Quintanilla Pérez, but the legacy of this Tejano superstar — who was on the brink of crossing over to the English-language music market — lives on. In an Austin American-Statesman story last week, I took a look at Selena’s legacy, and how she’s impacted everything from pop culture to style.

Selena fans will honor her memory with tributes throughout the year, and especially during her birthday month in April when the Queen of Tejano would have turned 44 years old.

Here’s a look at some Austin-area events. Know of more upcoming Selena tributes? Contact nflores@statesman.com.

April 10: Puro Chingón Collective will present an interactive screening of the film “Selena” at 7 p.m. at The Off Center at 2211-A Hidalgo St. Guests will receive a bag of props to be used during key points throughout the movie.

April 14: TheGlitoris’ third annual TuezGayz Selena tribute party at Barbarella (611 Red River St.) Doors open at 10 p.m. Small Selena tributes at 11 p.m., midnight and 1 a.m. $5 cover

April 16: Bidi Bidi Banda Presents: A Selena Birthday Celebration concert at the ABGB at 9 p.m. (Sold-out show.)

Austin American-Statesman videographer Kelly West recently chatted with Selena tribute band Bidi Bidi Banda lead singer Stephanie Bergara about how she interprets Selena.

April 16: Alamo Drafthouse presents a Selena Sing-Along movie screening at South Lamar and Alamo Drafthouse Village at 7 p.m.
April 17-18: Although this is in Corpus Christi, we thought you’d like to know about the highly anticipated Fiesta de la Flor festival featuring music by artists such as Los Lobos, Nina Diaz (of Girl in a Coma), AB Quintanilla y Los Kumbia King AllStarz and more.

 

¡A Viva Voz! celebrates U.S. Latino art, culture on April 2

Pioneers in Cuba's rap scene, female MCs Las Krudas, Odaymara Cuesta, left, and Olivia Prendes began rapping about a decade ago. They left behind their life in Cuba, and now call Austin home.  Photo by Alberto Martinez/American-Statesman
Pioneers in Cuba’s rap scene, female MCs Las Krudas, Odaymara Cuesta, left, and Olivia Prendes began rapping about a decade ago. They left behind their life in Cuba, and now call Austin home.
Photo by Alberto Martinez/American-Statesman

The extraordinary range of U.S. Latino experiences translates into a rich mix of diverse cultural art works, from Afro-Mexican poetry to Chicano political cartoons. For more than a decade, the LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections at the University of Texas has been celebrating the diversity within U.S. Latino arts and culture with ¡A Viva Voz!

In its 13th edition, ¡A Viva Voz! will bring together Central Texas-based poets and spoken word artists to share unique perspectives on migration and identity on April 2 starting at 7 p.m.

Featured artists include Cuban hip-hop duo Las Krudas, Afro-Mexican poet and author Ariana Brown, educator and Third Root hip-hop collective member Marco Cervantes, and historian/poet/educator Teresa Palomo Acosta. Poet and playwright Celeste Guzmán Mendoza will moderate the event, which will include light refreshments.

¡A Viva Voz! began as a way introduce community members to the rich resources found at the Benson. “It continues to be important for those reasons, particularly as the Latina/o population increases in and around Austin,” according to Margo Gutiérrez, U.S. Latina/o Studies Librarian at the Benson Latin American Collection.

Find the Benson at Sid Richardson Hall Unit 1, 2300 Red River St., on the UT campus.